As a retailer do I have to charge the price advertised on goods?

This is an interesting question which the group I was in debated at the F2 Business Huddle on Friday 10th February 2017.

Funnily enough on 13th February the BBC reported that customers of a large retail brand are being overcharged by out of date offers read more…

Without going into too much detail of contract law, the price marked on goods is called an invitation to treat. The customer offers an amount of money which may be accepted by the retailer (or it may not). Of course, if the customer’s offer is the same as the amount marked on the goods the retailer is more likely to accept it, but the important point is that they don’t have to.

That is why a retailer is perfectly correct to refuse to sell a 50″ Flat Screen TV which has been mis-priced at £49.99 when it should be £349.99. What they should do is withdraw it from sale rather than just charging the higher price. Because if the retailer charges more than the price marked on the goods then they may breach The Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008. This is also the case when the till is programmed with a higher price to that marked on the goods.

Do remember that, although not often used in retail shops in the UK, haggling is perfectly feasible.

Free Southern Entrepreneurs Event – Regulation for Small Business

06 Dec 2016 10:00 – 13:00

Enterprise Centre – PORTSMOUTH

This workshop will give an awareness of the areas of regulation that may apply to a business and how to go about developing compliance controls as a response to the ever increasing number of regulations and need for operational transparency.

Read more and book your place on the Southern Entrepreneurs website…

I'm thinking about opening an online shop, what do I need to do to protect my business?

There is a significant investment in trading online so it’s prudent to make efficient sales to maximise the return on investment.

Your terms of business are crucially important. This means they need to be clear, enforceable and don’t leave room for things to come back to bite you.

There are legal requirements including:

  • information you need to put on your website;
  • consumer protection legislation (if you are selling to non-business customers);
  • industry specific requirements; and
  • data protection and privacy considerations.

It is also worth remembering that scrutinising a website is easy for regulators such as:

  • Local Authority Regulatory Services (Environmental Health, Trading Standards and Licensing);
  • The Competition and Markets Authority;
  • The Advertising Standards Authority; and
  • The Information Commissioners Office.

If you need any help then please take a look at our solutions  or get in touch to discuss your requirements.

My secondhand car is really not up to scratch, what can I do?

When you buy something as an individual i.e. not for your business, trade or profession you have certain Consumer Rights.  Citizens Advice Bureau give excellent advice on exercising these rights on their website www.citizensadvice.org.uk. Just go to the advice for the relevant country and type in the item you are having a problem with. They have all sorts of resources on the site including letters of complaint. I hope you find it useful.

(July 2016 Question 2)

Southern Entrepreneurs – Subsidised Training

3 March Winchester 10am to 1pm £35 or £25 early booker price

Customer Service – one for everyone with customers

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9 March Bordon 10am to 1pm £35 or £25 early booker price

Blogging for business – for beginners, or seasoned bloggers

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15 March Romsey 10am to 1pm £35 or £25 early booker price

Mindfulness,relaxation, stress avoidance – invest in yourself

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17 March Portsmouth 10am to 1pm £35 or £25 early booker price

Twitter advanced – what do you do next? Make twitter work even harder for you

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22 March Eastleigh 10am to 2pm £35 or £25 early booker price

Digital skills – module 3

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23 March Basingstoke 10am to 1pm £35 or £25 early booker price

Sell online legally – Ebay or Etsy or just from your website, do it well and remain within the law

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Snipping Red Tape With Crimson Crab

Many thanks to Reputation Advocate, Lorna Jackson from Advance and Get Noticed for organising this feature in etc magazine.

We thoroughly enjoyed our morning discussing business issues with Laura Cartledge and you can read the whole February edition here.