Reputation Advocates Top Tips for 2019 John Simmons, Sim Compliance

Think Simple!
Being baffled by H&S talk or the fear of having to commit huge resource into getting Health & Safety right in your workplace is often the biggest barrier in getting anything done at all. The HSE have a general rule of thumb – the bigger the company and the more risk exposure to the safety of employees, then the higher the expectation is in doing more.

So, for smaller companies with little risk, the expectation or requirement to cover the basics is often quite minimal and can often be achieved simply by considering the “what would happen if..” scenario:
“Have I considered how we will evacuate our premises in the event of a fire?”
“Is that individual capable of carrying that load?”
“Do I need to get those items of electrical equipment tested?”

A common-sense approach, supported by simple documented evidence when needed, goes an awfully long way in demonstrating compliance.

Don’t be put off by the ghost in the cupboard that is workplace safety. DO SOMETHING, even a little goes a long way in keeping your employees and business safe.

Empower your employees.
It has become a legal requirement for all employees to think and act safely in the workplace. Gone are the days when it was a given that the employer is culpable for any workplace accident or incident.

Empower your employees to get them thinking about how they need to keep themselves safe at work. A sense of ownership brings a sense of pride and with this a drive to raise and deal with any H&S concerns.

It’s a win-win situation so don’t hesitate, get your employees involved!

Sim Compliance

June F2 Business Huddle

F2 Business Huddle with Cairn

Networking with a purpose

Friday 9th June 2017 

Midday until 2pm

Denvilles House
33 Emsworth Road
Havant
Hampshire, PO9 2SN

Reputation Matters

Reputation Advocate, Graham Martin from Red Pixel Creative will provide an overview of key elements that are used in graphic design and how they help to bring a successful design together.

If you miss this one the Next F2 Business Huddle is on 14th July 2017.

£14 on the door includes a light lunch and free parking. (Reputation Advocates – £10.)

Read more and book your place..

When to use an apostrophe

I don’t know about you but it really bugs me when I see an apostrophe being used incorrectly. If you have a reputation to uphold then the last thing you want to do is damage it by sending out written material that contains errors.

You wouldn’t believe the problems this tiny little punctuation mark can cause. It’s so insignificant you probably don’t even notice it when you’re reading at normal speed….

….and that’s the nub of the issue. People either don’t notice it’s there (or not) or they don’t notice whether it’s correct (or not), but for pedants like me, I do notice it!

So, let’s have a quick look at the only two instances when an apostrophe should be used.

To show that something belongs to someone, e.g.

Singular nouns and personal names:

The dog’s tail – says that the tail belongs to the dog.

John’s car – says that the car belongs to John.

Personal names that end in –s:

Charles’s ball – says that the ball belongs to Charles.

BUT some place names are an exception to this rule, e.g. St Thomas’ Hospital

Plural nouns that end in –s:

The dogs’ bowls – says that the bowls belong to some dogs.

Employees’ workplace – says that the workplace belongs to the employees.

Plural nouns not ending in –s:

The men’s hats – says that the hats belong to the men.

The children’s toys – says that the toys belong to the children.

The women’s coats – says the coats belong to the women.

To show that letters have been left out, e.g.

I’m – short for ‘I am’

They’re – short for ‘they are’

Didn’t – short for ‘did not’

He’ll – short for ‘he will’

It’s – short for ‘it is’

The apostrophe goes where the letters have been missed out and are used this way in informal writing. You should not shorten words when you are writing formal letters or emails.

One of the commonest mistakes I see is where people use an apostrophe to express a plural, especially when figures are involved, e.g.

In the 1980’s…

This is incorrect because it’s talking about the decade from 1980 to 1989 so it’s a plural and should be written ‘1980s’.

As a proofreader this kind of mistake is the sort of thing that I’m on the lookout for, not just because I’m a pedant, but to ensure that your writing is accurate, looks professional and is error-free. This gives you peace of mind safe in the knowledge that whatever you’re publishing will mean your readers will focus on your message or the meaning of your content and not looking for the next mistake.

If you would like me to help you to ‘get it right first time’, then please contact me on:

T: 07843 304743

E: peter@ppgproofreading.co.uk

Speak soon

Peter Clarke

aka The OopsProofer & Crimson Crab Reputation Advocate