Crab Insight September 21

Red Tape Busters Volume 8, Issue 12, `Outsourcing’

 

Welcome to the September edition of Crab Insight

Now we are into September and the kids are back at school the weather has finally improved and we are all sweltering behind the desk again and it’s time to get back to business.
 
The Online F2 Business Huddle is back this coming Friday 10 September and we’re looking forward to catching up.
 
Crimson Crab celebrated ten years in business last month.  Over the last ten years, we’ve helped loads of businesses with their compliance conundrums and data protection difficulties. and look forward to helping more in the future.
 

Claudia Crab’s September Focus

Claudia the Crimson Crab icon

“Outsourcing”

“If you deprive yourself of outsourcing and your competitors do not, you’re putting yourself out of business.” Ryan Khan – Founder of The Hired Group, author of Hired! The Guide for the Recent Grad, and star of Hired on MTV Networks.

Outsourcing is the business practice of hiring a party outside a company to perform services and create goods that traditionally were performed in-house by the company’s own employees and staff. Outsourcing is a practice usually undertaken by companies as a cost-cutting measure. As such, it can affect a wide range of jobs, ranging from customer support to manufacturing to the back office. Key Points

  • Outsourcing can be used to reduce labour costs, together with the cost of overheads, equipment, and technology.
  • Skill and knowledge gaps can be filled using third party experts.
  • Outsourcing is also used by companies to focus on the core aspects of the business, trusting the less critical operations to outside organisations.
  • On the downside, communication between the company and outside providers can be hard, and security threats can escalate when multiple parties access sensitive and personal data.

To make sure you do everything possible not to get let down by someone else, do your diligence before selecting an outsourcing partner. Our focus is to provide easy ways of carrying out diligence. If you need practical help please do take a look at our solutions:

 

 

The big question this month is:

How can I maintain my business reputation when outsourcing services? 

Look out for our social media posts and our blog later in the month as we help you explore this in more detail.
 
Top tip – Understanding your compliance obligations and responsibilities when outsourcing is crucial, our Business MOT can help

 


F2 Business Huddle Online

Friday 10 September 2021

12 noon to 2 pm

Future F2 Business Huddle dates for your diary

Friday 8 October 2021

Friday 12 November 2021

Friday 10 December 2021

Get your ticket on Eventbrite


Reputation Advocates

When you need a reliable and dependable expert click on the crabAccredited Crimson Crab Reputation Advocate Logo


Feedback

We love to receive feedback and it really helps us to improve our services for everyone.

 

Until next month look after your reputation!!

Ethical, legal, responsible trading wave
E: enquiries@crimsoncrab.net | W: www.crimsoncrab.co.uk  

Copyright (c) 2021 Crimson Crab Ltd, all rights reserved.

Crab Insight October 2020

Red Tape Busters Volume 8, Issue 01, Reassurance

Welcome to the October edition of Crab Insight

Our word of the month for October is Value. As we focus on HR management throughout this month, we believe having a team who know and feel appreciated can have a huge positive impact in many areas of your company. So make sure you show your staff that you value their work.

Claudia Crab’s October Focus

Claudia the Crimson Crab icon
“If you are taken to a Tribunal and don’t have policies in place to cover such things as grievances and disciplinary matters – it’s too late and all you can do is damage limitation.” Robert Briggs – Compliance Director Crimson Crab

Make sure you deal with your greatest asset, the people who work for you, through appropriate Human Resources policies and procedures. Our sister organisation HR Wise provides a suite of documents which create a framework to facilitate good management including:

  • an employment contract (statement of particulars)
  • a staff handbook with a full set of procedures
  • access to an email support line

 

Top tip – Visit the HR Wise website for more information

 

F2 Business Huddle Online

The next FREE

F2 Business Huddle online

is on

Friday 13 November 2020

12 noon to 2 pm

Get your ticket on Eventbrite

Reputation Advocates

 

When you need a reliable and dependable expert click on the crab

Accredited Crimson Crab Reputation Advocate Logo

Feedback

We love to receive feedback and it really helps us to improve our services for everyone.

Until next month look after your reputation!!

Ethical, legal, responsible trading wave
T:023 9263 7190 | E: enquiries@crimsoncrab.net | W: www.crimsoncrab.co.uk

Copyright (c) 2020 Crimson Crab Ltd, all rights reserved.

How to protect the reputation of your business when outsourcing

There are many benefits to outsourcing work, from increased efficiency to cost advantages, it seems a no-brainer to take advantage of another’s skillset when the time is right for your business.

But, if you fail to do the due diligence when outsourcing and something goes wrong, it may cripple your business.

As a responsible businessperson, if you fail to conduct the reasonable steps to avoid a tort or offence within your company and they do arise, you’re at fault.

That’s why we’ve listed some considerations to support you with ensuring you carry out the due diligence and protect the reputation of your business when outsourcing.

  1. Do both sides of the agreement hold the same expectations?

Mismatched expectations can create countless obstacles in business. One way to avoid this from happening is to ensure everything is written down on paper, then agreed and understood by everyone involved with the outsourced work.

  1. Have a contract agreed.

Similar to the expectations have a contract which states what work will be carried out, completed by when and by who, as well as a clear price too. A contract has the power to be a simple reference for a solution to any conflict.

  1. What’s the reputation of the business you are outsourcing work to?

Seems obvious, right? But companies do fail to do their research regarding the reputation of someone who is completing work for them.

If the service someone provides isn’t recommended, why would you use them to support your company? You wouldn’t.

  1. Do they know their health and safety?

If an outsourced service poses a health and safety risk to your workforce and you don’t mitigate it, then if an accident takes place the responsibility falls on your shoulders.

  1. Is the company you’re outsourcing to savvy with data protection?

GDPR – you’ve heard it before and will continue to hear all about it into the future. Why? Because peoples’ personal data matters.

If you’re outsourcing work to someone required to deal with data within your business (making them the processor), for example, the personal details of your clients, then you as the controller are responsible for how the outsourced work is handled. You also need a written contract covering data processing.

  1. Are those claiming to be an expert actually an expert?

If you’re looking to outsource an element of your business, such as HR, then is the person claiming to have the ability to complete the work actually competent in it?

For further details on how to avoid having a negative impact on your business for when you outsource work, get in touch with Crimson Crab.

Is my company’s website legal?

Building a website is easy, right? With the click of a few buttons and some vibrant graphics, you’re ready to go. Yes, perhaps, but is it compliant?

Even though your website is your organisation’s shop window, it’s important for it to look good and entice your target audience, it’s also crucial for it to be legally compliant.

But – what does that mean and how can you ensure it is compliant? 

All websites must conform to the Data Protection Act (and GDPR Regulations).

“If a business can’t show that good data protection is a cornerstone of their practices, they’re leaving themselves open to a fine or other enforcement action that could damage bank balance or business reputation.”

“Three-quarters of us don’t trust businesses to do the right thing with our emails, phone numbers, preferences and bank details. I find that shocking.”

Elizabeth Denham UK Information Commissioner

Your website is a powerful tool to grow your business – but can also be detrimental to the business if it isn’t compliant.

That’s why our tips are some of the top things to consider when it comes to your company’s website.

Always have a valid reason: Personal information from individuals and organisations can be useful for many reasons – but do you have a valid reason to use it for your intentions? Be clear about WHY you’re collating peoples’ details – and what it’ll be used for. Always give them the opportunity to give you permission in the correct way if you need to.

Security is key: If your website isn’t secure, you’re leaving yourself and your visitors susceptible to hackers and cyber-attacks. Don’t be responsible for this!

Is your privacy information in check? One of the most important documents on your website – above any information about what you sell – should be your privacy notice. Many businesses use a privacy policy, whatever you call it, it must contain specific information about your use and processing of personal data and if it’s not there you are not covered. Feel free to get in touch for more details.

Charity employee status

The High Court held that an individual appointed as the “shepherd in charge” of the spiritual wellbeing of the congregation of a religious charity was a charity trustee and not an employee and had been validly removed from office by the trustees of the charity.

(Trustees of the Celestial Church of Christ v Lawson [2017] EWHC 97)

Workers' Status

The Court of Appeal have decided that a plumber was a worker for the purposes of the Employment Rights Act 1996 and the Working Time Regulations 1998 as well as an employee within the extended meaning of the term in the Equality Act 2010. This was in spite of the plumber’s contract labelling him as an independent contractor.

There is significant interest in worker status at present, especially following the employment tribunal decisions in the Uber and CitySprint situations and in light of the ongoing Taylor review into modern working practices.

(Pimlico Plumbers Ltd and Mullins v Smith [2017] EWCA Civ 51)

Information Commissioner fine Hampshire County Council £100,000

Thank you to Mandy Tourle at Paperwise Solutions for letting us know about this recent fine from the Information Commissioner relating to the sale of an office in Havant.

Essentially personal data was not disposed of correctly meaning that people had access to it who should not have.

It’s a timely reminder when moving offices etc make sure that all confidential documents are destroyed or moved.

Read the full details of the Monetary Penalty Notice.

If you are concerned about the adequacy of your Data Protection procedures then our Data Protection MOT may be just what you are looking for. Find out more…

The three top risks to reputation

After receiving a poor performance review, an employee takes to social media and speaks negatively about the organisation and its leaders, creating a dialogue around the organisation’s culture that goes viral…

A cybercriminal discovers a vulnerability in an organisation’s security system, steals the Social Security numbers of millions of its customers, and demands a ransom payment for the decryption key needed to recover the sensitive data…

A third-party vendor fails to follow regulations when handling client records and inadvertently releases sensitive customer information, resulting in negative media attention and a steep fine for the organisation…

Read more in the source article: Triple threat: How to handle three top risks to reputation | Compliance Week

Do you need an anti bribery policy?

It is illegal to offer, promise, give, request, agree, receive or accept bribes. The purpose of an anti-bribery policy is to protect your business. You should have one if there is a risk that someone who works for you or on your behalf might be exposed to bribery.

Need some help?