How are you following the rules and regulations that affect your business?

The rules and regulations your business is required to follow may differ from one industry to the next.We're open

It’s your responsibility to ensure you are following what’s right for your type of business and that your team are copying your good example too.

Certain organisations are regulated differently. For example, financial services providers, investment firms and consumer credit firms alike are regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority, while care homes and hospitals are monitored by the Care Quality Commission. Food businesses are regulated by the Food Standards Agency and have to be registered with the local authority.

Even though they are three different sectors, they are accountable to a regulatory body that will ensure everything the business does is ethical, responsible and aligned with the law.

So, who are you regulated by and why is this important? Well, it depends. Ultimately, most businesses are regulated by an industry-specific regulator – but other sectors have less regulation.

The industries which aren’t heavily regulated in the UK include cleaning services, plumbing and recruitment.

That doesn’t mean to say that there is a free for all, everyone must follow the various and continually-changing UK rules and regulations set by Parliament, regardless of whether they have an industry-specific regulator or not.

Rules and regulations can be complicated and maybe a challenge to follow, especially if you’re not an expert on this matter.

But there’s a simple way to build on your understanding of how it works – and we call it the Onion Analogy.

There are several layers to rules and regulations and, aligning our explanation to the Onion Analogy, we’re going to uncover three layers.

Layer one of the onion – The regulatory bodies you must follow

These include, but aren’t limited to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA), the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and more.

Generally, these bodies give guidance on the area they cover but they also have enforcement powers when it comes to breaches of the law.

Every company – including yours – must follow various authorities if it is to adhere to UK law.

Layer two of the onion – The industry-specific regulatory bodies you are accountable to

Similar to the earlier examples for the financial, health-sector and food sectors, industry-specific regulatory bodies are the organisations that specialise within the area your business works.

Other examples include the Environment Agency (EA), the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA), Ofcom, the Gambling Commission and more.

Layer three of the onion – The industry norms. What are others doing which is right? 

The final layer within the Onion Analogy is your industry norms – what are others within your sector doing which is right for your consumers.

It’s impossible for us to give you a definitive answer on whether you are following the rules and regulations for your sector. However, if you’re looking for some expert insight and guidance into whether what you are doing is right or requires improvement, our Business MOT is a great place to start.

Business MOT

Crab Insight March 2021

Red Tape Busters Volume 8, Issue 06, `Regulatory Regimes’

 

Welcome to the March edition of Crab Insight

So the evenings are drawing out and the clocks spring forward soon. Spring is definitely in the air with crocuses and daffodils in bloom.

Despite this, our focus at Crimson Crab HQ is on regulatory regimes, as they affect all businesses to varying degrees.

HR management, data protection and health and safety management can be problematical so please do take a look at some of our solutions:

 
 
 

Claudia Crab’s March Focus

Claudia the Crimson Crab icon

Regulatory Regimes

“Many people who try to do big bold things in the world find out it’s not about the money or the technology: It’s about the regulatory hurdles that will try and stop you.“ – Peter Diamandis, US Businessman founder and chairman of the X Prize Foundation

There are a vast array of regulators in the UK many of whom have varying impacts on business depending on the industry, from the Care Quality Commission and the Law Society to the Charity Commission and Ofqual.

However, there is a significant number such as the Information Commissioners Office (ICO), the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) and the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) which are universal. 

The regulators’ purpose is to ensure there is a level playing field and protect the weaker party in any transaction (which is usually the client or customer).

If a regulator has cause to investigate a business, they will try to demonstrate insufficient control over business processes and procedures.

It makes sense to be in a position to show that you have done everything possible to comply and that you carry out checks to make sure that your procedures work.

That way the regulator will be more likely to help resolve compliance failures, rather than take enforcement action which can prove costly for a business and damaging to its reputation.

This follows Crimson Crabs strapline:

Ethical  |  legal  |  Responsible

How are you following all the rules and regulations that affect your business? 

Look out for our social media posts and our blog later in the month as we will hopefully be able to flesh out your thinking.

Top tip – A great starting point is to understand the regulatory regimes that apply to your business and our Business MOT can help


F2 Business Huddle Online

Friday 12 March 2021

12 noon to 2 pm

WE ARE LIMITED TO 100 PLACES

FOUR PLACES ARE LEFT

TO AVOID DISSAPOINTMENT 

Get your ticket on Eventbrite


Reputation Advocates

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Feedback

We love to receive feedback and it really helps us to improve our services for everyone.

Until next month look after your reputation!!

Ethical, legal, responsible trading wave
T:023 9263 7190 | E: enquiries@crimsoncrab.net | W: www.crimsoncrab.co.uk

Copyright (c) 2021 Crimson Crab Ltd, all rights reserved.

Acknowledge the risks facing your business and be ready to take action

Our minds can be a powerful tool when it comes to addressing matters which could have a detrimental impact on business.

What’re we talking about? Risk.

The attitude towards the urgency of addressing risks for business often comes too late.

Managing business risks may seem a daunting task – especially when there are countless types of risk out there.

But it’s important to understand not all risks should be approached and managed in the same way. Every case is unique and may require varying actions.

The type of risk you as a business owner may face can alter from one extreme to the next.

These may be:

  • Economic risks
  • Compliance risks
  • Reputation risks
  • Competition, or comfort, risks
  • Security and fraud risks
  • Financial risks
  • Operational risks

Failing to manage risks can affect your reputation and, in some worse cases, sink the company you are invested in. Now that’s something nobody would like to happen.

But tackling risks doesn’t just stop at the initial hurdle of acknowledging them; new risks are frequently appearing within any business so it’s necessary to evaluate and execute risks on a continuous basis.

A policy, process or procedure should be implemented within your business on how you deal with risk when it arises.

It’s no good having an attitude of “this is something we need to sort now as it has been brought to our attention recently” as it’ll be too late to address.

It’s good practice for business people to be proactive towards doing something about the risks a company is faced with before it’s too late.

Don’t be ignorant about the risks you face.

Compliance model – driving the culture of the organisation to be compliant.

Things to think about before Brexit

If you haven’t already thought about it there are some things that you will need to do to prepare your business for Brexit.

Especially if you:

  • import or export goods or services to the EU,
  • exchange personal data (including customers’ addresses, staff working hours or information you give to a delivery company) with an organisation in Europe (this includes using websites or services hosted in Europe & processing personal data from Europe), or
  • you use or rely on intellectual property (IP) protection (this includes copyright, trademarks and patents).

There is a useful step by step guide at https://www.gov.uk/get-ready-brexit-check

Respond to regulatory regimes

The regulators’ purpose is to ensure there is a level playing field and protect the weaker party in any transaction (which is usually the client/customer).

If a regulator has cause to investigate a business, they will try to demonstrate insufficient control over business processes.

It makes sense to be in a position to show that you have done everything possible to comply and that you carry out checks to make sure that your procedures work.

That way the regulator will be more likely to help resolve compliance failures, rather than take enforcement action which can prove costly for a business.