Crab Insight July 2021

Red Tape Busters Volume 8, Issue 10, `Website Compliance’

 

CRIMSON CRABS TENTH ANNIVERSARY EDITION

 

Welcome to the July edition of Crab Insight

“There’s an old African proverb that says “If you want to go quickly, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” “ Al Gore

The first of August is the tenth anniversary of Crimson Crab’s formation as a limited company. We are delighted to be celebrating a decade in business. We’ve had some ups and downs over the years and we most certainly would not be celebrating if it were not for the support we have enjoyed from our customers and clients, the Reputation Advocates, our suppliers, and our friends. We have made some great friendships through Crimson Crab and as we say about the F2 Business Huddle “there are no strangers here; only friends you haven’t met yet”. So as Crimson Crab moves into its second-decade lookout for some exciting announcements about the future. In the meantime look after your reputation.   If as a business owner you need assistance getting back on top this month especially with Covid Secure Workplaces please take a look at:

Grounded Safety

Our focus in July is website compliance. Data Protection forms a pivotal part of website compliance and if you need help please do take a look at our solutions:

 

For fuss-free HR Management you can’t go wrong with:

 

 

 

Claudia Crab’s July Focus

Claudia the Crimson Crab icon

“Website Compliance”

“Your website is the shop window to your business and the world can look in. So too can the regulators.” Robert Briggs DTS compliance specialist.

There are certain things that all websites need to take into account to be legally compliant:

  • Data protection – dealing with all personal data collected, think contact forms, registrations etc.
  • Cookies – telling users about cookies used and their purpose and obtaining informed consent
  • Disclosure – letting people know who they are dealing with without hiding behind a business or trading name and for registered businesses full disclosure
  • Disability discrimination – disabled people including Blind people must not be discriminated against. Businesses must make reasonable adjustments to help disabled individuals access their goods, facilities and services which will mean making their website accessible.

There are additional requirements for online sales to consumers or end-users – (retail):

  • General trading legislation – for example, no unfair commercial practices, rules about the sales of age-sensitive products (e.g. alcohol, knives, solvents, videos & games), sales of products to which safety legislation applies, rules around food businesses, etc 
  • Consumer Contracts Regulations – the regulations specify the way that cooling-off periods for online sales are given and detail requirements about the provision of information. 
  • Card payments – there is a prohibition of additional charges for using such payment methods. 
  • Complaints – there are rules set out by the Consumer Rights Act around the way that complaints are dealt with and the provision of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) and access to the European Commission’s Online Dispute Resolution Platform. 

Although not a legal requirement there are some things that we would strongly recommend are included on a website:

  • Terms of website use – Protect your website and its users with clear and fair website terms and conditions, governing the use of the website and setting out the legal rights and obligations between the owner and users. Key issues such as acceptable use, privacy, registration and passwords, intellectual property, links to other sites, termination and disclaimers of responsibility should be included.
  • Copyright – make sure there is a notice (using the name of the legal entity, not the business/trading name) to protect your intellectual property. It won’t stop unscrupulous people from stealing your IP but it will make it easier to do something about it.  Don’t forget to respect others’ intellectual property or serious consequences may result.
  • Provision of Services – The regulations say that if you are providing services (on or offline) the disclosure of certain specified information is required. A website is an ideal place for this information. 

So our big question this month is:

How do I know if my company’s website is legally compliant? 

Look out for our social media posts and our blog later in the month as we endeavour to answer this. Also our Website MOT may help
 

 

Top tip – To understand your compliance obligations and responsibilities you need to know what you need to comply with our Business MOT can help with this

 


F2 Business Huddle Online

We’re taking a break in August but the F2 Business Huddle Online will be back on Friday 10 September 2021

12 noon to 2 pm

Get your ticket on Eventbrite


Reputation Advocates

When you need a reliable and dependable expert click on the crabAccredited Crimson Crab Reputation Advocate Logo


This months featured Reputation Advocate

 

Data Wizard Admin logo

 

Good admin is vital…and that’s what Datawizardadmin delivers!

 

 

 


 
Feedback

We love to receive feedback and it really helps us to improve our services for everyone.

Until next month look after your reputation!!

Ethical, legal, responsible trading wave
E: enquiries@crimsoncrab.net | W: www.crimsoncrab.co.uk

Copyright (c) 2021 Crimson Crab Ltd, all rights reserved.

Why should I bother with Terms and Conditions for my business?

It’s fair to say that most consumers would be wrong to claim that they always read the Terms and Conditions before agreeing to use a product or service.

Millions of people across the UK are guilty of failing to read the Terms and Conditions, otherwise known as the boring bits or the small print, and that’s a pretty big deal. But why?

Terms and Conditions act as a legally binding contract between a company and its clients.

The agreement doesn’t only set out the rules and guidelines that must be followed, but it clearly sets out expectations from all sides of the party too.

There can be serious ramifications for companies who trade without Terms and Conditions. This can lead to unwelcomed headaches for customers too.

Within this blog, our spotlight is on some of the top issues Crimson Crab have encountered as a result of companies not having clear Terms and Conditions.

 

  1. Lack of ability to limit liability. As a business, if you don’t bother having Terms and Conditions, there are all sorts of liability that you may have to accept when you don’t need to.

 

  1. Difficulties if your client fails to make payment. Without Terms and Conditions, you may find yourself in a costly situation if court action needs to be made due to a client failing to make a payment on the work you have completed. By ensuring they agree to your payment terms within your Terms and Conditions, you’re protecting yourself from unwanted surprises and difficulties in Court.

 

  1. Unrealistic expectations. Without Terms and Conditions, clients may claim the work you are doing isn’t sufficient and fails to meet their expectations. By drawing up clear and easy-to-understand Terms and Conditions, you’re making it clear what work you will complete for the price agreed.

 

  1. Misunderstanding about compliance with legislation. Many businesses struggle to understand that Terms and Conditions play an important role in ensuring you are complying with the law including for example Trading Standards legislation. Having a set of Terms and Conditions allows companies to publish essential details, such as its name and address or consumer cancellation rights as required.

 

  1. Limited ability to protect intellectual property. This is all about protecting the creations of the mind, like inventions, literacy, and artistic work. Without highlighting in your Terms and Conditions the use to which your client may put your intellectual property, people may steal your ideas which could have otherwise been making you money. Setting out your stance on Intellectual Property will reduce the likelihood of this happening and will make it easier to deal with if it does.

 

There is so much to think about when you are trying to manage your own business, so it’s easy to prioritise another matter over Terms and Conditions.

But by having these you will establish an essential legal binding contract, on your terms as long as they are fair, which can protect you and your clients for years to come.

It’s good practice to regularly review your Terms and Conditions as circumstances can change as can the law, but also how your business operates may change over time.

Whether you are a start-up or an established business, Terms and Conditions are crucially important today more than ever.

At Crimson Crab, we can help with anything related to the Terms and Conditions belonging to your business. From reviewing to drafting your Terms and Conditions, a great starting point is our Business MOT get in touch to take it today.

Crab Insight April 2021

Red Tape Busters Volume 8, Issue 07, `Deal with risk’

 

Welcome to the April edition of Crab Insight

As lockdown eases we need to move forward with our businesses and identify opportunities for growth or at least to get back to where we were before lockdown.

Beware though every opportunity carries with it some degree of risk.

So, Claudia Crabs focus this month is dealing with risk. It’s important not to lose perspective, don’t sweat the small stuff and ignore the real show stoppers.

HR management,  health and safety management and data protection can all be problematical in their own ways. If you need some practical help please do take a look at some of our solutions:

 
 
 

Claudia Crab’s April Focus

Claudia the Crimson Crab icon

“Deal with risk”

““Opportunities pass by frequently, but people don’t always see them. Taking risks grants you an invisible set of glasses that reveal the many opportunities which surround you.” ― Anas Hamshari, Businessma n With An Affliction

A good starting point is a SWAT. Strengths, weaknesses, Opportunities & Threats analysis In this way, both internal and external factors are identified, remember weaknesses are best thought of as areas for improvement. If you find your self struggling with external factors try using the acronym PESTEL.  This will help you think about the opportunities and threats likely to develop. PESTEL, polictical, economic, social, technological, environmental and legalThe use of a SWAT Matrix helps you identify where:

strengths play to opportunities or reduce threats

weaknesses hold you back or exacerbate threats

SWOT Matrix Once the major areas are identified you can carry out a risk assessment in a systematic way. risk assessment The key is to unpick how you can reduce the likelihood of a high-risk occurrence happening and, or reduce the damage done to the business if it does happen. That way you will be taking responsibility for your businesses strategy by proactively managing risks. You will also be in a better position to deal with issues that crop up as they should not come as a surprise.  This follows Crimson Crabs strapline:

Ethical  |  legal  |  Responsible

So this month we are asking the question:

Does your strategy take account of business risks? 

Look out for our social media posts and our blog later in the month as we will hopefully be able to flesh out your thinking.
Top tip – A great starting point is to understand some of the risks that your business faces and our Business MOT can help with this

F2 Business Huddle Online

Friday 14 May 2021

12 noon to 2 pm

WE ARE LIMITED TO 100 PLACES

TO AVOID DISSAPOINTMENT 

Get your ticket on Eventbrite


Reputation Advocates

When you need a reliable and dependable expert click on the crabAccredited Crimson Crab Reputation Advocate Logo


 
Feedback

We love to receive feedback and it really helps us to improve our services for everyone.

Until next month look after your reputation!!

Ethical, legal, responsible trading wave
T:023 9263 7190 | E: enquiries@crimsoncrab.net | W: www.crimsoncrab.co.uk

Copyright (c) 2021 Crimson Crab Ltd, all rights reserved.

Nine ways to help improve the leadership and management of your business

How your business is managed and led will have an impact on its success – that’s why we’ve put together nine ways to improve leadership and management.

Leading boats

But first, it’s important to understand that although there are crossovers between management and leadership, there are very clear and significant differences too.

Management is all about the day-to-day operations of an organisation.

Leadership concentrates on where an organisation is going and who will be on the journey.

So how can you improve the leadership and management of your business and thus the way it is governed?

Here are some tips to help:

1. Understand the vision of your business.

Every organisation should have a clear idea of where they wish to be within an agreed time frame. If there is no drive to achieve an agreed objective within five, 10 or 15 years, then expecting to have fully engaged leaders and managers may be minimal. Some people are content in their positions and satisfied with a routine, but it’s that consistency of doing the same thing which won’t support the success of your business and shall certainly not play a part in improving how your business is run.

2. Understand the mission of your company.

What is your company currently doing to reach its vision – that’s what your mission is about. A mission statement compliments a vision and, if you wish to improve the leadership and management of your business, ensure everyone on your top table are aligned with this.

3. Use core values to build upon everything you do.

Core values form part of your company’s mission statement. But they deserve their own point as everything you do, from decision making on large projects to recruiting the right person onto your team, should have your core values at the foundation.

4. Be clear in who is responsible for what – and ensure people have the right skills to fulfil their role.

One way to improve the management and leadership of your business is to define roles and responsibilities. Ensure people know who does what. It sounds simple, but miscommunication is evident within many organisations. Clarity can mitigate this.

5. Never stop learning.

Pretty straightforward, have leaders and managers who implement the best practice they have learnt into best practice to benefit your business.

6. Evaluate the performance of your top team.

Evaluating performance, and tracking metrics are important for every business which thirsts to succeed. If your top team aren’t performing, take steps to address the issue.

7. Ensure there is a timely provision of information.

If your expectation is to receive information from senior members of your team, ask them to have this to you within an agreed time-frame. The leadership and management of your business will crumble if you’re continually waiting for key team members to provide you with important information.

8. Encourage accountability.

The act of holding each other accountable shouldn’t only take place at a leadership and management level but within all levels of the business. Embracing and encouraging accountability will support everyone’s engagement within the activities of your business.

9. Don’t take life too seriously.

There are obstacles in life and challenges along the way, but don’t let them tarnish your character and ambition. Enjoy journeying with other people like you and do your very best to improve the leadership and management of your business.

For further information about how your business is governed, as well as ensuring everything you do is fair, legal and ethical, get in touch with Crimson Crab today.

Secure your cash flow: Disclose your legal trading entity

Your clients have the legal right to understand exactly who they are dealing with. If they don’t, you could find yourself with agreements being void and not getting paid for the work you do…

Imagine it – business is booming and you have just had one of the strongest quarters to date.

Then suddenly, your customers stop paying and you have no legal way to get your money as a result of not abiding by trading laws and disclosing your legal trading entity.

But what is the legal trading entity?

In a nutshell, it’s the name of the business used for tax purposes. It’s the ‘legal’ name of the person or entity that owns it.

If you’re a sole trader, a plasterer for example, then the legal trading entity of your business is your name with or without your initials or forenames.

So, if your name is Richard James Smith, the legal name for your business could be Richard James Smith, Richard J Smith, Richard Smith R. J. Smith, R Smith or simply Smith.

If you trade under a name which does not include your surname, for example, Phoenix Plastering Services you would have to give your surname to every current or potential client.

For example Smiths Phoenix Plastering Services or Richard Smith trading as Phoenix Plastering Services together with an address at which you can be contacted. In legal parlance an address at which you will accept the service of documents.

For unincorporated partnership in gets a little more complicated as the legal trading name is the last names (with or without initials or forenames) of all of the partners.

For limited liability companies, partnerships and corporations, the business’ legal name is the one that was registered with Companies House including Ltd, LLP, PLC etc. In addition, there are specific disclosure requirements for these types of business including full corporate name, registered office address, registered number and place of registration.

The trade or business name is the name a company uses for advertising and sales purposes. It’s imperative you understand that this is different from the legal trading names previously described.

It’s a legal requirement that your legal trading entity is included on all business documents and their electronic equivalents which include invoices, letters, emails and websites.

If you’re a business that may trade under a different name to your legal trading entity and may be unsure of the rules, get in touch with the Crimson Crab team today.

Avoid the HR blame game

HR management is critical for every business and helps companies succeed in hiring the right employees for a job, keeping team members engaged, and supporting their growth and development.

So why do so many companies fail with effective HR management?

Your workers are your greatest asset. It’s important that you take care of them in order for them to take care of your business. If you don’t, it’s probable that unwanted headaches may arise.

Looking after your team may come naturally to you as a business owner or manager, but having the appropriate policies and procedures in place ensures clarity and fairness.

Without the correct policies and procedures, you can make your business susceptible to various HR issues.

An example of such a problem that Crimson Crab has had to deal with related to the apparent lack of understanding of a leave policy. Something both employees and employers must be on the same page with.

The director received a text from an employee outside of the business working hours, with a request for leave.

The employee had already booked their holiday while expecting the response from the director to be an approval.

The request was for a significant break at a busy time of year. There was an unwritten rule that all such leave should be brought up first to avoid putting pressure on other team members to provide cover.

Quite rightly, the director acknowledged the request for leave, saying they would think about it.

A little while later, the request for leave was declined, and you can imagine the discomfort and uproar this caused between the employee and their boss… not to mention the workforce too.

Some time later the employee left the company. This triggered a formal complaint via an Employment Tribunal.

Eventually, the former employee withdrew their case and didn’t lead to a ruling. However it had consumed much time, energy and money which may have been used more profitably elsewhere

A lesson was certainly learnt. And what might that lesson be?

It’s important to have a robust policy which is clear to all staff and most importantly is consistently adhered to, and applied without fear or favour in a timely way.

If it was crystal clear how leave requests and there approval worked within this particular business – which forms an important element to any company’s HR management– none of this would have taken place.

It’s essential that everyone understands the HR policies and follows the processes in place.

For more information on how to keep your HR policies up-to-date with Crimson Crab, and to avoid the horrible consequences of issues which may arise, get in touch with a member of our team today.

Three don’ts to protect your customer relationships

The relationships any organisation has with its customers is important if it is to succeed. Also, the retention of clients is a pretty big deal.  

But, at times, we understand our working lives can be testing and offering excellent customer service may be a challenge.

However, within any context, business owners and their teams must strive to deliver a strong service to its clients if it wishes to achieve a positive reputation… while protecting it too!

That’s why our top three don’ts are to support you with protecting the relationships you have with your customers.

  1. When things go wrong, don’t ignore them!

Most businesses treat their consumers well. How do we know this? Because, if they didn’t, there would be no business.

But what happens when things do go wrong? Firstly, it’s important you don’t bury your head in the sand if something, such as a complaint, takes place. Be prepared for any negative response from your clients; have a clear complaints process and be genuinely ready to help people when they’re not happy.

  1. Breathe! Don’t respond on the hoof…

Your focus must always be on protecting the relationships you have with your customers.

To have someone walk away after using your service or product with a negative opinion can be detrimental to how other people perceive your offering.

We’re only human, so it’s understandable if you’re upset as a result of some negative feedback.

Nonetheless, take a moment to consider how you are going to approach your response, as well as how what you say will have the ability to preserve an existing relationship.

  1. Understand the law behind consumer complaints, and don’t neglect it!

There is law around dispute resolution, complaints and mediation, so it’s important you understand what is appropriate/what isn’t if you’re to address the negative experience of a consumer correctly.

Let’s use a complaint from a customer as an example. Businesses have to comply with rules and regulations when dealing with an issue.

These rules don’t necessarily change from one industry to the next, but some sectors do offer an alternative dispute resolution.

Fancy some bedtime reading? The Consumer Rights Act 2015 is a good place to start.

The Act consolidates consumer protection law and legislation while also providing consumers with their rights and remedies, so it’s an essential read for any business that deals with consumers.

For further details on how to protect your consumer relationships, and the best tips on what to do if something does go wrong, get in touch with Crimson Crab today.

 

Is my company’s website legal?

Building a website is easy, right? With the click of a few buttons and some vibrant graphics, you’re ready to go. Yes, perhaps, but is it compliant?

Even though your website is your organisation’s shop window, it’s important for it to look good and entice your target audience, it’s also crucial for it to be legally compliant.

But – what does that mean and how can you ensure it is compliant? 

All websites must conform to the Data Protection Act (and GDPR Regulations).

“If a business can’t show that good data protection is a cornerstone of their practices, they’re leaving themselves open to a fine or other enforcement action that could damage bank balance or business reputation.”

“Three-quarters of us don’t trust businesses to do the right thing with our emails, phone numbers, preferences and bank details. I find that shocking.”

Elizabeth Denham UK Information Commissioner

Your website is a powerful tool to grow your business – but can also be detrimental to the business if it isn’t compliant.

That’s why our tips are some of the top things to consider when it comes to your company’s website.

Always have a valid reason: Personal information from individuals and organisations can be useful for many reasons – but do you have a valid reason to use it for your intentions? Be clear about WHY you’re collating peoples’ details – and what it’ll be used for. Always give them the opportunity to give you permission in the correct way if you need to.

Security is key: If your website isn’t secure, you’re leaving yourself and your visitors susceptible to hackers and cyber-attacks. Don’t be responsible for this!

Is your privacy information in check? One of the most important documents on your website – above any information about what you sell – should be your privacy notice. Many businesses use a privacy policy, whatever you call it, it must contain specific information about your use and processing of personal data and if it’s not there you are not covered. Feel free to get in touch for more details.

Crab Insight July 2020

Red Tape Busters Volume 7, Issue 10, Profile

Welcome to the July edition of Crab Insight

What has been your biggest learning in recent weeks, and how will this change the way you present yourself to people?

Our word of the month for July is PROFILE, it’s all about how you will present yourself so as to stand out from the crowd in a digital-focused world?

Crimson Crab is on your side and ready to help you meet the challenges ahead.

Stay safe.

Claudia Crab’s July Focus

Claudia the Crimson Crab icon

“A website is a shop window to the world – it is also a great way to showcase breaches of the law”

If you have a website you need to make sure that you comply with the law in the following areas:

Disclosure

You should identify yourself correctly and give an address at which you can be contacted, there are specific requirements for a registered business, (e.g. Ltd, PLC, LLP).

Copyright

It’s imperative that you protect your copyright effectively and make sure that you do not breach other peoples copyright. It makes sense to also have a document setting out the terms of use of the website.

Disability Discrimination

Businesses have an obligation to make reasonable adjustments to help disabled individuals access their goods, facilities and services. The Equalities Act 2010 requires that websites are accessible to disabled people including Blind people. One way of meeting this responsibility is for website owners to comply with the WCAG 2.0 standard at Level AA the UK Governments recommended best practice for accessibility. 

Data Protection

You need to make sure that you comply with the Data Protection laws (including the GDPR) for all contact forms and any personal data collection. You also need to make sure that you have an appropriate Cookies policy detailing the cookies used and their purpose (and for example use a pop-up or other means to obtain ‘consent’).

Provision of Services

If you provide any services on or offline you have to make sure you comply with the Provision of Service Regulations. They require service providers to make available contact details where information requests and complaints can be sent, together with other specified information.  One way of complying is to include the required information on a web page and proactively provide the link to clients when discussing your services.

E-commerce

When using a website for e-commerce purposes then you still need to comply with the law that relates to a bricks and mortar outlet along with some special rules for an online business.

So there must be for example no unfair commercial practices and suitable control of sales of age-sensitive products (e.g. alcohol, tobacco, fireworks, knives, solvents, videos & games). If any products are sold to which safety legislation applies, for example, toys, bicycles, electrical goods the rules have to be followed, as they do when food of any type is sold. 

The Consumer Contracts Regulations require that you provide certain information when selling online, and also require you to tell the customer about their right to cancel the purchase within 14 days (not 7 any more). Failure in this respect can mean that the customer can enjoy a much longer cancellation period (up to 12 months)!

You also have to be careful to comply with the requirements of Card Providers and you cannot make additional charges for using such payment methods.

There are also rules around the way that complaints are dealt with and the provision of access to Alternative Dispute Resolution and the European Commissions Online Dispute Resolution Platform.

Top tip – We can check out your website


F2 Business Huddle Online

The next online F2 Business Huddle is FREE

It’s on Friday 10 July 2020

12 noon to 2 pm

It is going to be the biggest F2 Business Huddle ever – so far

All the favourite features that you have come to know and love at the F2 Business Huddle – online


Reputation Advocates

When you need a reliable and dependable expert click on the crab

Accredited Crimson Crab Reputation Advocate Logo

Feedback

We love to receive feedback and it really helps us to improve our services for everyone.


Until next month look after your reputation!!

Ethical, legal, responsible trading wave
T:023 9263 7190 | E: enquiries@crimsoncrab.net | W: www.crimsoncrab.co.uk

Copyright (c) 2020 Crimson Crab Ltd, all rights reserved.

Data Protection Essential Questions

Data protection essentials, 23 questions do you know all the answers?

  1. Do you understand what data flows through your business and have recorded:
    • what personal data you hold;
    • where it came from;
    • who you share it with; and
    • what you do with it?

  1. Have you recorded at least one of the six legal reasons for processing the data?
    • If you use consent
      • it is good consent;
      • you record how it has been given; and
      • you record and manage ongoing consent.
    • If you are relying on legitimate interests
      • you have done the three-part test; and
      • you can demonstrate that you have fully considered and protected individual’s rights and interests.

  1. Are you are currently registered with the Information Commissioner’s Office?

  1. Do you provide privacy information to individuals, e.g. clients, customers, employees and suppliers?

  1. Can you deal with a Subject Access Request i.e. requests from people to access their personal data within one month?

  1. Do you make sure that the personal data you hold remains accurate and up to date?

  1. Do you securely dispose of personal data that is no longer required or where an individual has asked you to erase it?

  1. Do you know what to do when someone asks you to restrict the processing of their personal data?

  1. Can someone move, copy or transfer their personal data from your system to another safely?

  1. Can you deal with an individual’s objection to the processing of their personal data?

  1. Do you know if you carry out automated decision making and if so, do you have procedures in place to deal with the requirements?

  1. Do you have a data protection policy, and demonstrate your compliance with it?

  1. Do you regularly review the effectiveness of your data handling and security controls?

  1. Do you provide data protection awareness training for all staff?

  1. If you engage third parties to process your businesses personal data on your behalf (e.g. email marketing companies, database providers, cloud-based service providers), do you have a written contract with them which meets the legal requirements and carry out suitable and sufficient diligence?

  1. Do you know the information risks you have and their business impact so that you can manage them in a structured way?

  1. Have you have implemented technical measures and policy to integrate data protection into your data processing?

  1. Do you understand when you must conduct a Data Protection Impact Assessment?

  1. Have you nominated a data protection lead, or a Data Protection Officer (DPO) if required or preferred (note this role can be outsourced)?
    • If you have a DPO have you notified the ICO?

  1. Do you champion a positive culture of data protection compliance in your business?

  1. Do you have an information security policy supported by suitable security measures?

  1. Do you record all personal data breaches no matter how trivial?
    • Can you manage and resolve them?
    • Do you know which must be reported to the ICO?
    • Do you know which must be reported to the data subject?

  1. Do you know what must be done if any personal data processed by others on your behalf is transferred outside the European Economic Area?

If you don’t know an answer you had better find out fast!