Data Protection Essentials

Here are 23 questions that you really should know the answers to:

  1. Do you understand what data flows through your business and record:
    • what personal data you hold,
    • where it came from,
    • who you share it with and
    • what you do with it?
  1. Have you recorded at least one of the six legal reasons for processing the data?
    • If you use consent
      • it is good consent,
      • Do you record how it has been given; and
      • Do you record and manage ongoing consent?
    • If you are relying on legitimate interests
      • Have you done the three-part test, and
      • Can you demonstrate that you have fully considered and protected individual’s rights and interests?
  1. Are you are currently registered with the Information Commissioner’s Office?
  1. Do you provide privacy information to individuals, e.g. clients, customers, employees and suppliers?
  1. Can you deal with a Subject Access Request i.e. requests from people to access their personal data within one month?
  1. Do you make sure that the personal data you hold remains accurate and up to date?
  1. Do you securely dispose of personal data that is no longer required or where an individual has asked you to erase it?
  1. Do you know what to do when someone asks you to restrict the processing of their personal data?
  1. Can someone move, copy or transfer their personal data from your system to another safely?
  1. Can you deal with an individual’s objection to the processing of their personal data?
  1. Do you know if you carry out automated decision making and if so, do you have procedures in place to deal with the requirements?
  1. Do you have a data protection policy, and demonstrate your compliance with it?
  1. Do you regularly review the effectiveness of your data handling and security controls?
  1. Do you provide data protection awareness training for all staff?
  1. If you have third parties that process your personal data, do you have a written contract with them which meets the legal requirements?
  1. Do you know the information risks you have and their business impact so that you can manage them in a structured way?
  1. Have you have implemented technical measures and policy to integrate data protection into your data processing?
  1. Do you understand when you must conduct a Data Protection Impact Assessment?
  1. Have you nominated a data protection lead, or a Data Protection Officer if you are required or prefer to? Note this role can be outsourced)?
    • If you have a Data Protection Officer have you notified the Information Commissioner’s Office?
  1. Do you champion a positive culture of data protection compliance in your business?
  1. Do you have an information security policy supported by suitable security measures?
  1. Do you record all personal data breaches no matter how trivial?
    • Can you manage and resolve them?
    • Do you know which must be reported to the Information Commissioner’s Office
    • Do you know which must be reported to the data subject?
  1. Do you know what must be done if any personal data processed by others on your behalf is transferred outside the European Economic Area?

If you don’t know the answers you really had better find out – we can help – take a look at our data protection solutions.

Crab Insight June 2020

Red Tape Busters Volume 7, Issue 09, Restoration

Welcome to the June edition of Crab Insight

Love your business – we do! As companies across the UK prepare for the ‘new normal’ we’ve just made our word of the month ‘Restoration’.

How are you going to restore your services while also taking account of and adapting to what was for most very difficult times?

Remember we are here for you, to help you meet the challenges ahead.

Stay safe.

Claudia Crab’s June Focus

Claudia the Crimson Crab icon

Personal Data Processing

“When it comes to data protection, small businesses tend to be less well prepared. They have less to invest in getting it right. They don’t have compliance teams or data protection officers. But small organisations often process a lot of personal data, and the reputation and liability risks are just as real.”

Elizabeth Denham, Information Commissioner

The Information Commissioner is the UK regulator for data protection and can impose substantial penalties for infringements. Data subjects also have a right to claim compensation if a company has caused the damage by a breach of the rules.

When you collect data you need to be transparent about why you are collecting it and how you will use it. This should be set out in an easy to find (and read) privacy notice or policy.

Where you share data with anyone else you need to make it clear with whom you are sharing it and why.

There are specific requirements and guidance if you outsource your data handling to a third party data processor. You must carry out suitable diligence and have written agreements in place which cover defined points.

If you use CCTV, cloud computing, cookies or engage in direct marketing, to name but a few, there is also specific guidance which must be followed.

Our top tip is if you process personal data, make sure you pay the data protection fee and give the correct privacy information to people, don’t forget employees and suppliers as well as customers and clients.


F2 Business Huddle Online

Location: Your Workstation

The next online F2 Business Huddle is FREE

It’s on Friday 12 June 2020

12 noon to 2 pm

It is going to be the biggest F2 Business Huddle ever – so far

All the favourite features that you have come to know and love at the F2 Business Huddle – online


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Feedback

We love to receive feedback and it really helps us to improve our services for everyone.


Until next month look after your reputation!!

Ethical, legal, responsible trading wave
T:023 9263 7190 | E: enquiries@crimsoncrab.net | W: www.crimsoncrab.co.uk

Copyright (c) 2020 Crimson Crab Ltd, all rights reserved.

Remain resilient during the COVID-19 outbreak, yes, but keep compliant too

It will be some time before life returns to “normal” in the UK and even then, things will no doubt be different.

Teams up and down the county have responded to what’s happening and stayed resilient by working from home.

But, how is remote working supporting many companies in their attempt to be resilient through these strange economic times? And, how are they remaining compliant every step of the way?

Working from Home

Thousands, if not millions, of employees, are working from home as a result of this pandemic.

From Microsoft Teams calls to Zoom, progress in using technology has proven to be an excellent benefit for businesses across the country.

Technology (and a reliable Internet line) hasn’t been relied on as much as it has in these unprecedented times.

While working away from the office is allowing businesses to continue efficiently, it does come with risk:

Data Protection

With an increase in the number of employees working from home, your people must understand the importance of protecting personal data on the IT they are using.

It’s all well and good if your company is following Data Protection legislation within an office environment, you must still ensure this doesn’t get thrown out the window with your remote workers. Especially if they are new to working at home or remotely.

If you need any help check out our Data Protection Solutions here: https://www.crimsoncrab.co.uk/our-solutions/data-protection-information-risks

Cyber Security

Producing an effective Cyber Security Policy comes with an understanding of where your own security is currently at.

If your business is susceptible to a cyber-attack then you must be ready to deal with this unfortunate risk… both for those working in an office and from their own home. Any system is only as good as the weakest link and regrettably, this is most likely to be an individual away from the discipline of the office environment.

Similar to protecting data, think about how you can remain compliant while keeping resilient throughout the lockdown.

Understand more about Cyber Security at the NCSC website here: https://www.ncsc.gov.uk/section/about-ncsc/what-is-cyber-security

Scams

Stay safe from online scams by taking simple steps while working from home.

Check your privacy settings, be aware of unsolicited emails, always use unique, strong passwords (use a trusted password manager – not the browser), update your software regularly, make sure your network is set up correctly, change all the default passwords on devices to a secure one and avoid using public Wi-Fi connections.

There is more information about Fraud and Cyber Crime on the Action Fraud website here: https://www.actionfraud.police.uk

Remember – your business must trade legally and it is your responsibility to do so ethically – no matter where your staff are based. Take full responsibility and get in touch with us on how you can remain compliant while focused on being resilient.

Data from Europe if the UK leaves the EU with no deal

If the UK leaves the EU without a deal and you are a small or medium-sized business or organisation based in the UK that needs to maintain the free flow of personal data into the UK from Europe, you will need to take some action.

Putting in place a contract between you and the sender on EU-approved terms, known as standard contractual clauses (SCCs) will be sufficient in most cases. The contract needs to be in place before the date that the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

If you receive personal data into the UK from the EEA (the EU plus Iceland, Liechtenstein and Norway), you need to:

  1. decide whether standard contractual clauses (SCCs) can help you maintain the flow of data
  2. select the right SCCs.
  3. understand the SCCs.
  4. complete the SCCs.

The ICO has produced an interactive tool to help with these steps.

If you are a larger organisation or multinational company, a data protection professional, or you already have well-established transfer mechanisms, the Information Commissioners Office (ICO) has specific guidance on leaving the EU and on international transfers on their website.

Things to think about before Brexit

If you haven’t already thought about it there are some things that you will need to do to prepare your business for Brexit.

Especially if you:

  • import or export goods or services to the EU,
  • exchange personal data (including customers’ addresses, staff working hours or information you give to a delivery company) with an organisation in Europe (this includes using websites or services hosted in Europe & processing personal data from Europe), or
  • you use or rely on intellectual property (IP) protection (this includes copyright, trademarks and patents).

There is a useful step by step guide at https://www.gov.uk/get-ready-brexit-check

GDPR Myth Busting – We need to appoint a Data Protection Officer

Not necessarily.

All organisations must designate someone to take responsibility for data protection compliance.

Some are required to appoint a Data Protection Officer.

Future thinking organisations are choosing to appoint a DPO, to help regulate their privacy and build a stronger foundation of trust with their customers.

The GDPR allows for organisations to appoint an external DPO based on a service contract.

If you do appoint a DPO you must notify the ICO.

Find out more

GDPR Myth Busting – There is no requirement to register with the ICO

You now need to pay the data protection fee.

The old regime of registration has been replaced with the requirement to pay the ICO a data protection fee unless you are exempt.

On payment, your business is added to the public register.

There are three different levels of fee, based on the risks associated with the personal data processing and depends on a variety of factors including how many members of staff you have and your annual turnover.

The ICO has started prosecuting businesses that are not paying the data protection fee.

Find out more

GDPR Myth Busting – We have to have a Data Protection Policy

No, you don’t. A data protection policy will help you address data protection in a consistent manner and demonstrate accountability, but it is not a legal requirement.

However, individuals have a right to know that you are collecting their data, why you are processing it and who you are sharing it with.

You should publish this privacy information on your website and within any forms or letters, you send to individuals.

What information you supply depends on whether you obtained the personal data directly from the individual or a third party.

It is not good practice to copy other companies privacy notices as it will not reflect your processing activities and this type of superficial compliance is very easy for a regulator to spot and challenge.

Find out more

GDPR Myth Busting – So we just won’t tell them

Compulsory breach notification is in place.

A personal data breach is a breach of security leading to the accidental or unlawful destruction, loss, alteration, unauthorised disclosure of, or access to, personal data.

You must keep a record of all personal data breaches.

You have to notify the ICO of a breach unless it is unlikely to result in a risk to the rights and freedoms of individuals. This has to be done without undue delay, but not later than 72 hours after becoming aware of it.

Where a breach is likely to result in a high risk to the rights and freedoms of individuals, you must also notify those concerned directly and without undue delay.

If you are a data processor you are under an obligation to notify the data controller, but not the ICO.

So for example not using the bcc function on an email to a number of recipients is a potential data breach. This should be recorded but will not need to be reported to the ICO unless the email contains information which has a privacy risk such as home address details. If the email contained bank account details there is a potential for fraud and this would need to be reported to the ICO and the individuals concerned.

PS if you get an email that should have been bcc’ed do not hit ‘reply all’ to tell the sender of the issue as you are committing a data breach yourself.

Find out more